0 Cart
Added to Cart
    You have items in your cart
    You have 1 item in your cart
    Total
    Check Out Continue Shopping
    3 Delicious Ways to Eat Cookies

    3 Delicious Ways to Eat Cookies

    Who doesn't love a good cookie? If there's one thing for sure, it's that the U.S. just can't get enough of them. In fact, Americans consume around 2 billion of them per year and are eaten in approximately 95% of all households.

    When speaking in terms of definitions, cookies are considered "little cakes" due to their size and shape. However, they do not always have to be consumed in that form. While you can really never have enough cookies, there are plenty of creative ways to eat them that think outside of the cookie box. Check out these ideas below: Make a cookie pie. The only things that America loves just as much as cookies are pies. That being said, why not combine two of the most delicious desserts out there?! When combined with the right ingredients, cookie crumbs make the perfect pie crust. To make a cookie pie, start with your favorite cookie flavor of choice. Typically, this recipe works best with crunchier cookies. If your cookie flavors are softer, simply pop them in the oven for a few minutes in order to dry them out. You need enough cookies to render 2 cups of crumbs. From there, place in a blender or food processor and blend until fine, sandlike crumbs form. Then, add a half stick of melted butter and pulse. Next, take the crumbly mixture and line into a pie pan. Bake for 10 minutes at 350 and when cooled, fill with your favorite pudding or whipped cream and top with even more cookie crumbs. Delicious! Create your own ice cream sandwiches. Perfect for any party or hot summer day, ice cream sandwiches are a satisfying handheld treat that children and adults alike enjoy. To make ice cream sandwiches, find two cookies of choice (if you're classic, go for chocolate chip cookies!). Then, scoop an ice cream of choice and make your sandwich! If you want to get extra fancy, roll the sides with your topping of choice. Freeze for 30 minutes to let it set before serving. Create your own cookie butter. Just when you thought cookies couldn't get any better, they came out with spreadable cookie butter. Now, you can make your own at home! While biscoff cookies are the traditional cookie butter flavor of choice, you can use whatever cookie recipe and flavor you desire. To make cookie butter, you need 2 cups of cookie crumbs of choice, 2 tablespoons brown sugar, 1/4 cup heavy cream, and 1 tablespoon melted unsalted butter. Stir the ingredients together until well combined. Do you like these recipes? How do you like to eat your favorite cookie flavors? Let us know in the comments below!

    These 4 Ingredients Can Drastically Affect the Outcome of Your Chocolate Chip Cookies

    These 4 Ingredients Can Drastically Affect the Outcome of Your Chocolate Chip Cookies

    Ah, the ubiquitous chocolate chip cookie. If you peered into the 92% of American households that regularly eat cookies, chances are that you have the beloved cookie flavor in your pantry.

    Like most love stories, America fell in love with chocolate chip cookies by accident. It all started in the 1930s at the Tollhouse Inn in Whitman, Massachusetts. Ruth Wakefield, the innkeeper there, was responsible for making the daily batch of cookies for her guests. One day, she ran out of baking chocolate and instead broke up small pieces of chocolate morsels and incorporated them into her cookie recipe. Since then, America has had a torrid love affair with chocolate chip cookies. However, not all cookie flavors are created equal -- especially when it comes to the chocolate chip cookie. In fact, with just a small ingredient modification, your cookie flavors, textures, and taste will change tremendously. Check out these ingredients that can drastically affect your cookies: Sugar Using white sugar will result in a flatter, yet crispier cookie with a lighter color. If you use brown sugar, it will result in a denser and moister cookie. Brown sugar also slows down the development of flour, making a more tender cookie. Butter If you use melted butter when making chocolate chip cookies, the butter will end up dissolving the sugar, which will make the cookies tender and flat. If you cream together room-temperature butter with sugar, it will create air pockets, resulting in puffier cookies. Baking Soda Baking soda releases a carbon dioxide gas, helping the cookie dough to leaven. This renders a soft and fluffy cookie. Baking Powder Baking powder in your cookie will create a cookie that is soft and thick, but slightly harder. Chilled Dough By chilling your dough for 24 hours, you will have crisper, flatter cookies. How do you like your chocolate chip cookies? Let us know in the comments below!

    5 Reasons Why Cookies are the Best Dessert Out There

    5 Reasons Why Cookies are the Best Dessert Out There

    Of all desserts out there, nothing quite hits the spot like a cookie. And in the U.S. in particular, Americans have had a long-standing affair with the handheld dessert. But why all the hype? Read on to find out five reasons why cookies are awesome:

    Cookies Hit the Spot...Literally. Overall, the human tongue has four major taste receptors: bitter, sour, salty, and sweet. While the bitter and sour areas are located at the back of our tongues, the sweet area is right at the tip of our tongue. Because of this, the sweet indulgence of cookies never fails to satisfy. They're the Perfect Portable Treat Have you ever tried to take a piece of cake or a scoop of ice cream with you to lunch or in your pocket? If you have, it was likely a complete and utter disaster. Cookies are the ultimate portable snack that fit in just about any space, meaning you can take them any place. And because they have a longer shelf life, they're able to be shipped easily. That's why cookie delivery companies are making so much money! They're Incredible Versatile Can you name every cookie flavor out there? Chances are you wouldn't be able to. That's because the variety of cookie flavors out there are almost infinite. And that means there's something out there for everyone. Are you a fan of the classics? Then have the chocolate chip cookie, which incidentally recently celebrated its 78th birthday. If you have a hankering for cinnamon, try a snickerdoodle, a sugar cookie coated in cinnamon and sugar. From texture to flavor, there's something out there for everyone. They Remind Us of Home No matter who you are, chances are the smell of fresh baked cookies evokes memories from your childhood. Cookies are enjoyed in 92% of all households and exist in iterations across practically all cultures. Some culturally rooted traditions even involve cookies. Since the 1930s, for example, Children across Canada and the U.S. have been leaving out chocolate chip cookies and Christmas cookies for Santa Claus.

    The Sweet History of Dessert

    There are two kinds of people in this world: people who love dessert and people who couldn't care less. Us? We prefer to roll with the people that save that extra space at the end of the meal for a sweet treat, the ones who are stuffed silly but might still have extra room for just one or two chocolate chip cookies. Clearly, America has a serious and committed relationship with dessert. After all, 95% of Americans consume over 2 billion cookies per year -- that equals out to 300 cookies per person. That's a lot of cookie recipes! So how did we get here? While dessert is at the end of the meal, it clearly had to start somewhere. With that, sit back, relax and try not to drool as we take you back through time to tell you about the mouthwatering history of dessert.

    How Sugar Cane Changed the World Of course, we couldn't have such a big sweet tooth without sugar. Before sugar cane spread across the globe, ancient civilizations in Mesopotamia and India used honey and dried fruit to sweeten foods that were ultimately fed to the gods as offerings. Before 500 BCE, sugarcane was grown and refined in India and was then crystallized. By 500 CE, it was easy to transport. By 600 CE, the sugar trade was in full swing in Macedonia, China, the Middle East, and South Asia. During the Crusades, sugar spread to Europe and colonization further spread its use. In the Middle Ages, Europeans started to manufacture sugar, making it more available. However, in those days, sugar was extremely expensive and only the wealthy could afford to indulge on special occasions. Christmas cookies, for example, can be traced to Medieval recipes that were eaten on the holy day. Those cookie flavors still exist today. During America's Industrial Revolution, sugar became a mass-produced commodity and became extremely inexpensive. From there, the rest is sweet, sweet, history. The Sweet Present Today, desserts are a staple in just about every restaurant and household. For those with diet restrictions, they even have delicious flour free cookies on the market. Ah, the sweet possibilities of dessert are endless! What's your favor dessert and cookie flavors? Let us know in the comments below!

    Fun Facts About America's Favorite Cookie

    Fun Facts About America's Favorite Cookie

    If you love cookies, you are not alone. In the United States, 7 billion coolies are eaten each year. That means most people eat over 1,000 cookies each and every year. More than half of these cookies are homemade. Nearly 93% of all American households serve and enjoy cookies as treats or after meals. However, it's the chocolate chip cookie that's the most popular in the U.S. and around the world. How much do youknow about chocolate chip cookies? Fun Facts about Chocolate Chip Cookies:

      • They were created by accident Much like the discovery of penicillin, the chocolate chip cookie was created by a happy accident. Ruth Wakefied was an in keeper in Whitman, Massachusetts. One evening in the early 1930s, she added chocolate bits to her cookie batter because she assumed the chocolate would melt. The chocolate bits did not, and the iconic cookie was born. The owners of the Toll House Inn, where Wakefield worked later, claimed that they created the cookie. There is also an urban legend that Neiman Marcus was the true originator of the treat.
      • Their first name was "Butterdrop Do Cookies" Cookies are named by the way they are made, The different methods for making cookies are drop, molded, refrigerated, rolled, pressed and in bars. While Wakefield first ran her recipe for the cookies in a newspaper in the Boston area, she also published a cookbook in 1936. Named after the inn that she ran, "Toll House Tried and True Recipes" ran her recipe for chocolate chip cookies under her second name for the treat,"Chocolate Crunch Cookies."
      • Nestle gave Wakefield a lifetime supply of chocolate for her creation The chocolate company bought the cookie recipe from Wakeful in the late 1930s, and paid her with a lifetime supply of chocolate. In 1939, they introduced their version of the cookie, which is the now well known tear drop version.
      • The early chocolate chip cookies were small and very crispy Early chocolate chip cookies were the size of a quarter and eaten in one bite.
      • The world's largest chocolate chip cookie was HUGE It was weighed in at more than 40,000 pounds! The heavy cookie was 102-feet-wide. It was made and baked by the Immaculate Baking Company in Flat Rock, North Carolina in 2003. The previous record was 80-feet-wide. That is a lot bigger than a quarter! The company built a special oven to make the larger than life cookie.
      • World War II was good to the chocolate chip cookie People in Massachusetts began sending their family who were serving in the war these cookies in their care packages, The soldiers would share the cookies with their friends and colleagues, and soon, military from all over the country were requesting their families include the treats in their packages as well. This started a chocolate chip cookie craze throughout the nation.
      • The chocolate chip cookie is far and away America's favorite cookie This should come as no surprise to anyone who enjoys the tasty treat. More than 53% of American adults prefer the cookies over the next most popular kind, peanut butter. Peanut butter cookies are the preferred cookie for about 16% of then nation, while about 15% of people like oatmeal cookies the best.
      • The chocolate chip cookie is the official cookie of Massachusetts After a third grade class proposed the idea, the legislature voted to honor the cookie in 1997.
    The typical chocolate chip cookie recipe has flour, white sugar, brown sugar, baking powder, eggs, a dash of salt, butter or shortening, vanilla extract and chocolate chips. Other variations include nuts, milk, peanut butter and other fun additions. The chips that are used can be milk chocolate, dark chocolate, white chocolate or peanut butter. There really is no limit what can be done with this recipe. For softer and chewier cookies, people can melt the butter that is used in the batter rather than use it at room temperature. In recent years, companies have developed chocolate chip cookie recipes for flour free cookies and gluten free cookies. The chocolate chip cookie is an American classic that is now enjoyed all over the globe. These simple, yet delicious cookies can be made and enjoyed easily by people of all ages.